Private Practice

The simulation training program gives clinicians hands-on emergency experience at no risk to patients




Clinicians take part in simulation training sessions at the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Simulation Lab, learning firsthand how to deal with high-risk medical situations in a safe environment.

Clinicians take part in simulation training sessions at the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Simulation Lab, learning firsthand how to deal with high-risk medical situations in a safe environment. 

Practice makes perfect, as the saying goes, and Henry Mayo’s simulation training program takes that adage to a new lifesaving level.

Launched in 2014, the program offers three high-fidelity simulator manikins that provide clinicians with the opportunity to safely practice high-risk, low-volume emergency procedures.
“These are scenarios that require hands-on skills, teamwork, decision making, and effective communication,” said Colleen Krieger, RN, Simulation Education Specialist. 
The adult, pediatric and infant manikins are controlled by computers, and mimic patient responses such as pulse, breathing, and reactive pupils.  

Recent simulations have included a focus on sepsis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are more than a million cases of sepsis reported each year in the U.S. 

“Up to half the people who get sepsis will die. This can be reduced with early detection and rapid initiation of treatment,” Krieger said. 

Following the simulation training sessions in the hospital’s education center, participants are brought together for a debriefing to identify problems and find solutions through evaluation and discussion.  
“Ultimately, simulation training enables us to provide improved patient safety and care in real life. We are extremely fortunate to have a simulation lab in our community hospital,” Krieger said. “Simulation labs are commonly seen at large teaching hospitals, but through the support of multiple donors and our administrative team, Henry Mayo is able to provide this training.” IYH